Troop 334
Rush, New York
1. Scouting is not “cool”, so why join? The object of the Boy Scouts is to create an independent, responsible
and confident young man, who is able to take care of himself and others. You will learn how to become a leader
and many other skills that will benefit you for the rest of your life. Check it out—give it a chance. Don’t listen to others
who really don’t know what it’s about--find out for yourself. For some basic information, click here and refer to
question #2.

2. What, exactly, do Boy Scouts do—besides camping? Swimming, archery, shooting, aviation, computers,
photography and engineering are just a few things. Go to Question #19 for a complete listing of “merit badges”. For
more detailed information, click here.

3. What are the other benefits of membership? Add “Eagle Scout” to your resume and see how it opens doors to
better colleges and employment—just ask any Eagle Scout.
Eagle Scouts include: former US President Gerald Ford, Neil
Armstrong (the first man to walk on the moon),Stephen Spielberg (movie director), J. W. Marriott (hotels), Mike Rowe (TV’s ‘Dirty Jobs’ host) and Bill
Gates (Microsoft). Information on “ranks” and the path to becoming an Eagle Scout, is found by clicking here.

4. Do you need to be a Cub Scout before you can become a Boy Scout? No. Though many Cub Scouts become
Boy Scouts, it is not necessary. The Boy Scouts are a separate and unique organization. Everyone starts out at the
same point—regardless of past training.

5. What are the requirements to join? A boy who is at least 10 years of age and completed the 5th grade (or a
younger Cub Scout who has earned the “Arrow of Light” award). You may remain a member until you are 18 years
old.

6. Are the Boy Scouts a “military” organization? No. Military training and drills are strictly prohibited. You may
learn marksmanship (shotgun or rifle),
if you so desire.

7. What does it cost? Troop 334 has no membership dues. However, there may some costs involved with field
trips and uniforms.. Refer, also, to question #18.

8. How often are the meetings? Troop 334 holds weekly meetings during the school year. During the summer,
there are additional activities (field trips, camping, etc.), but no summertime weekly meetings.

9. How long are the meetings and where are they held? Usually, they are one hour in length. Troop 334 meetings
are held at the Stevens-Connor American Legion Post. To locate us, click on the “MAP” button, above, and a map
with directions will appear.

10. Do I have to wear a uniform? Yes, on specified occasions, but Troop 334 does not require it on all occasions.
Your will be told when you must wear it.

11. Who runs or manages the troop? Troop 334, itself, is boy-led, with experienced adult advisors. The adult
advisors are the Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters. These people interact directly with the boys, providing
guidance and advice. Each Troop has a “Committee” of adult volunteers who function like a Board of Directors. The
Committee makes policy decisions and manages the finances. They basically handle the business-end of running
the Troop and do not, normally, interact directly with the Scouts. Additional adults may be needed to provide
chaperones on field trips.

12. How do I find a “local” troop? Search the internet: click here: www.beascout.org or here:
www.senecawaterways.org
. Please consider joining Troop 334 by referring to the following question.

13. How do I decide on which troop to join? Go to a local troop's website, contact them for information, visit during
a regular meeting or an open house, talk to other boys or adults involved in that troop, but do check it out. To
contact someone at Troop 334, click here or on the “CONTACTS” button, above, and fill out the information request
form. Someone will contact you and provide information.

14. Do parents have to be present during the meetings or can they just drop their son off? Troop 334 parents
can bring you to meetings and drop you off. You need to be picked up at the end of the meeting or parents need to
make alternate arrangements (such as having another parent pick their Scout).

15. What kind of involvement is expected of a parent? Cub Scouting is family-oriented with lots of parent
involvement. Boy Scouts are boy-oriented, with minimal parental involvement. However, transport to meetings and
some events will be required of parents, unless alternate means are implemented. Parents may be asked to assist
as a chaperone on a field trip, but that involvement is voluntary. If a parent is interested in becoming a LEADER,
click here for more information.

16. Can women become involved in the Boy Scouts? Yes, adult women may serve as Scoutmasters, Assistant
Scoutmasters and Committee members

17. Will we be camping in a tent and do we need to buy camping equipment? Yes, some camping occurs in a
lodge and some occurs in a tent. No, you do not need to buy camping equipment for your Boy Scout. Tents are
furnished by Troop 334 or by the BSA. However, camping occurs during any season, so be prepared!. Parents and
family are not invited to campouts.

18. What about fund raising? Troop 334 runs a few fund raising events, but does no
door-to-door solicitations. Our main event is a chicken BBQ, held during the summer in Rush. Each Scout earns
money in his “account” with Troop 334, based on the hours that he volunteers with the fund raising effort. This money
is used to “pay” for Troop-related activity.

19. What are “merit badges”? Merit badges are recognition awards for learning about a particular subject that is
sponsored by the Boy Scouts. More information is found by clicking here

Merit badges are available for the following subjects:
American Business
American Cultures
American Heritage
American Labor
Animal Science
Archaeology
Archery
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Athletics
Automotive Maintenance
Aviation
Backpacking
Basketry
Bird Study
Camping
Canoeing
Carpentry
Chemistry
Cinematography
Citizenship in the Community
Citizenship in the Nation
Citizenship in the World
Climbing
Coin Collecting
Collections
Communication
Composite Materials
Computers
Cooking
Crime Prevention
Cycling
Dentistry
Disabilities Awareness
Dog Care
Drafting
Electricity
Electronics
Emergency Preparedness
Energy
Engineering
Entrepreneurship
Environmental Science
Family Life
Farm Mechanics
Fingerprinting
Fire Safety
First Aid
Fish and Wildlife Management
Fishing
Fly-Fishing
Forestry
Gardening
Genealogy
Geology
Golf
Graphic Arts
Hiking
Home Repairs
Horsemanship
Indian Lore
Insect Study
Inventing
Journalism

Landscape -Architecture
Law
Leatherwork
Lifesaving
Mammal Study
Medicine
Metalwork
Model Design and Building
Motorboating
Music
Nature
Nuclear Science
Oceanography
Orienteering
Painting
Pathfinding
Personal Fitness
Personal Management
Pets
Photography
Pioneering
Plant Science
Plumbing
Pottery
Public Health
Public Speaking
Pulp and Paper
Radio
Railroading
Reading
Reptile and Amphibian Study
Rifle Shooting
Rowing
Safety
Salesmanship
Scholarship
Scouting Heritage
Scuba Diving
Sculpture
Shotgun Shooting
Soil and Water Conservation
Skating
Signaling
Small-Boat Sailing
Snow Sports
Space Exploration
Sports
Stamp Collecting
Surveying
Swimming
Textile
Theater
Tracking
Traffic Safety
Truck Transportation
Water Sports
Veterinary Medicine
Weather
Whitewater
Wilderness Survival
Wood Carving
Woodwork
© 2014 Troop 334, Boy Scouts of America - Rush, NY. All rights reserved.